Thursday, June 4, 2015

Top Ten Fashion Trends From the 1940's

Rationing:

World War II impacted virtually every aspect of American life and fashion was no exception. In 1942, the United States imposed a rationing system similar to the one Great Britain had implemented the previous year, limiting, among other things, the amount of fabric that could be used in a single garment. Materials including wool, silk, leather and a fledgling DuPont Corp. invention called nylon were diverted for use in uniforms, parachutes, shoelaces and even bomber noses.

Jackets could be no more than 25 inches in length, pants no more than 19 inches in circumference at the hem, belts no more than two inches wide and heels no more than an inch in height. Hemlines rose to the knee in an effort to conserve fabric. Buttons, cuffs, pockets and decorative details like ruffles and lace were used sparingly. Women wore shorter, boxy jackets for a V-shaped silhouette reminiscent of military uniforms. Even Hollywood traded elaborate costumes for simplified designs, a move many claimed lent movies a new air of realism.

Nylon:

As soon as it was introduced in 1938, women embraced synthetic nylon as a replacement for silk stockings. In the early 1940s, however, with silk already diverted to the war effort, the government recognized similar uses for nylon and commandeered it as well. Women responded by coating their legs in tan makeup and drawing lines up the backs of their calves to mimic seams. By the time the war ended and stockings returned to store shelves, nylon had become a generic term for hosiery.

Swing skirts.

The swing skirt had a round cut designed to look best in full jitterbug twirl. Swing skirts were a common sight on USO dance floors as young women danced with uniformed men to the jazzy horns that characterized the Big Band Era. Housewives were known to wear a more conservative version of the swing dress, sometimes in polka-dot or tiny floral prints.

Hats:

Hats became one of the few ways to express individual style with minimal resources. They were worn in a wide range of styles and personalized with scraps of foil, sequins, netting, paper and string.

Hair and makeup:

Hairstyles became more elaborate as women sought ways to contrast their dull wardrobes. Shoulder length or longer hair was rolled into complex shapes and secured with bobby pins. Screen sirens like Lauren Bacall, Veronica Lake and Rita Hayworth popularized side parts and finger waves. Makeup was dramatic, characterized by matte foundation, powder, heavy brows and bright scarlet lips.

Platform pumps:

The wartime shortage of leather and steel forced shoe designers to get more creative and, as a result, shoes were cobbled from materials ranging from crocodile hide to cork. Shoes were more utilitarian than stylish, with low heels and limited color choices. By the mid to late 1940s, platform pumps with high heels in T-straps, ankle straps or open toes had replaced the dowdy wedgie with its flat shape and thick cork soles.

Menswear as womens wear:

A number of men may have spent the first half of the 1940s in uniform, but their civilian clothes came in handy for the women who filled their home-front jobs. Women raided the closets of absent men and tailored the suits to fit themselves. McCalls even introduced a pattern aimed specifically at modifying a masculine suit to fit feminine curves. Suddenly, the sexually ambivalent look pioneered in the late 1930s by Katherine Hepburn and Marlene Dietrich was radical no more. The emergence of the dress pattern and electric sewing machine led women to make their own suits from scratch, opting for gabardine due to the scarcity of wool. Many with physically demanding factory jobs soon began wearing practical pants and Rosie the Riveter jeans.

Sweaters:

By the mid-1940s, many women had abandoned the single-piece corset in favor of panties and structured bras that lifted and accentuated the bust line. In 1946, a well-endowed Jane Russell appeared onscreen in a cantilever bra designed by Howard Hughes, prefiguring the bullet-bra 1950s and the reign of the sweater girl. Loose-fitting cardigans were also popular, particularly on college campuses.

Sportswear:

The virtual disappearance of French fashion houses during the war led American designers to explore their own creativity. Designers like Bonnie Cashin and Claire McCardell were instrumental in the creation of sportswear, that singularly American look featuring coordinated separates that could be worn in layers or in various combinations. The trend not only gave women increased options and made it appear as if they had more clothes than they actually did, but also blurred the line between couture and ready-to-wear by showing women they could be both chic and comfortable without spending a fortune.

The New Look:

By the late 1940s, women craved a return to glamor and designers obliged with swirling skirts and shimmering evening gowns inspired by film stars like Ingrid Bergman, Barbara Stanwyck and Joan Crawford.

In 1947, French couturier Christian Dior almost single-handedly brought an end to wartime austerity with a fashion line observers christened the New Look. Severe angles were replaced with curves, hemlines dropped back below the knee and skirts were generously draped. Structured undergarments were key to the New Look, which featured broad shoulders, cinched waists, emphasized bust lines and padded hips. The pencil skirt was a figure-hugging alternative to bouffant skirts. Men, too, longed for freedom from conservative tailoring in khaki and olive drab. They found relief in wide-legged trousers, full-length coats and suits in an array of colors. Both mens and womens trousers featured higher waists, widely cut legs and cuffs and came in textured tweeds and jewel tones.

The New Look met with protest from women who had grown accustomed to baring their legs and were disinclined to cover them back up. Moreover, the opulent, fabric-rich designs seemed wasteful in contrast to wartime fabric restrictions. The desire for change prevailed, however, and the look flourished throughout much of the 1950s.



Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/1529787

Wednesday, May 27, 2015

Buy half sarees online and look like the splendid diva in them!!

Online shopping half sarees will help you to get some of the hottest picks of this season. Half sarees are highly trendy this season and is the first choice of women when they are indulged to wear sarees. Half sarees are hence some of the most feminine sarees out there. The latest trends in half sarees are as follows-

 Pop colours are considered very fashionable this summer. Wear attractive neons in pinks and blues and greens when you decide to buy half sarees. The pallu is in the neon colours which makes the entire saree very attractive.

Dual toned half sarees are also slowly making its way in the fashion charts. Dual toned half sarees have the entire pallu in the different shade of the same hue as that of the saree. This trend is usually followed with the water coloured sarees.

Half sarees with the pallu of entirely as different material and design is old but gold. These sarees are still highly popular due to their innovativeness.

Embroidered pallu of the half sarees are the first pick of the season when it comes down to choosing the bridal of wedding sarees. Heavy embroidery from resham, zaari, bead, gotta patti is generally preferred in such a scenario.

If you want to buy designer half sarees, then this should be your first choice. This pink and cream coloured half saree is light and can be worn in any season. This is essentially a party wear saree and is very light and easy to carry. The pallu is plain pink whereas the body is full of embroidery work in different layers. Other than that there is border work and thread work throughout the saree.

This georgette party wear saree is light and is easy to carry inspite of its heavy border work and embroidery. This orange and black saree is essentially charming and beautiful. The pallu of the saree is orange with black border work. Whereas the entire saree is black with heavy border work and there are also embroidery work all over. This is entirely suitable for any occasion or event.
This cream and black coloured half saree is the one which is most apt for any kind of wedding or functions. This saree is gorgeous with heavy work present throughout. The entire saree is cream in colour with heavy border work present throughout, while the pallu is black in colour with heavy lace, zaari and border work present all over. This saree is made up of georgette which makes it a light and breathable fabric.

Half saree online shopping will provide you with some of the best options in designer sarees. Thus you can be almost sure of getting gorgeous sarees at cheap prices and at heavy discount rates as compared to the local stores.

Saturday, April 4, 2015

Six hacks to looking like a celeb

From all grey to culottes and pleated mini skirts, here’s our round up of the best-dressed celebs this week.
   taylor
Lesson #1: Thigh-high slits are slimming
Body-con dresses can be risqué on a voluptuous figure. But you can trust Sonakshi Sinha to pick an option to rocks her curves. The actor opted for an all-navy dress featuring a zipper right down the center and a thigh-high slit. The break in the outfit stops her from looking too robust. So chic!
Shop: Mirage By Parul Bhargava nude solid dress, 35500
Lesson #2: Pleated mini skirts are back
We’re just going to say it – we’re jealous of Taylor Swift. It’s not fair that someone can look this adorable all the time? The singer picked a monochrome crop top and paired it with polka dot mini skirt to keep the look young and girly. She added a statement handbag that included a massive heart shaped print – we love!
Shop: Zalora black tops, 1899; s.Oliver white skirt, 1500
2
Lesson #3: Culottes for the night? Genius.
Goodbye jeans, hello culottes. Not only are they on trend – they make your waist appear narrow and come in light fabrics that are perfect for the summer. What’s not to love? Take a cue from Nimrat Kaur who teamed her cobalt pair with a sheer blouse and a bralet for a night out.
Shop: Faballey white top, 1200; W blue cullotes, 1999
Lesson #4: ‘All-black everything’ is foolproof
Rita Ora shows us how to do the brit version of head-to-toe black. Spotted in a structured coat, ankle boots, black shades and stockings, she looked every bit the stunner.
Shop: Annabelle By Pantaloons black blazer, 2999
3
Lesson #5: How to wear head-to-toe grey
Always wondered how you could wear a somber colour like grey? Kendall Jenner gave us some serious #styleinspo. She wore a grey blouse with textured sleeves, trousers and slate grey pointy pumps. The trick here is to go a shade darker with the shoes to give your look some depth.
Shop: SISTER'S POINT grey crop with sleeve detail, 2094; Dorothy Perkins charcoal peg, 1145; River Island grey stilettos, 4290
Lesson #6: Graphic tee + brogues = win
If there’s someone whose style we can’t get enough of, it’s Kangana Ranaut. She’s mastered the art of airport dressing. The actor picked a statement t-shirt paired with fitted skinny jeans and tan oxford shoes. The glasses add a geeky element to her outfit.
Shop: Vero Moda multi printed t-shirt, 1295; United Colors of Benetton blue skinny fit denims, 2499; Aldo Edeniel black lifestyle shoes, 4200
- See more at: http://www.wings2fashion.com/

Friday, March 13, 2015

Top Ten Fashion Trends From the 1940's

World War II impacted virtually every aspect of American life and fashion was no exception. In 1942, the United States imposed a rationing system similar to the one Great Britain had implemented the previous year, limiting, among other things, the amount of fabric that could be used in a single garment. Materials including wool, silk, leather and a fledgling DuPont Corp. invention called nylon were diverted for use in uniforms, parachutes, shoelaces and even bomber noses.
Jackets could be no more than 25 inches in length, pants no more than 19 inches in circumference at the hem, belts no more than two inches wide and heels no more than an inch in height. Hemlines rose to the knee in an effort to conserve fabric. Buttons, cuffs, pockets and decorative details like ruffles and lace were used sparingly. Women wore shorter, boxy jackets for a V-shaped silhouette reminiscent of military uniforms. Even Hollywood traded elaborate costumes for simplified designs, a move many claimed lent movies a new air of realism.
Nylon:
As soon as it was introduced in 1938, women embraced synthetic nylon as a replacement for silk stockings. In the early 1940s, however, with silk already diverted to the war effort, the government recognized similar uses for nylon and commandeered it as well. Women responded by coating their legs in tan makeup and drawing lines up the backs of their calves to mimic seams. By the time the war ended and stockings returned to store shelves, nylon had become a generic term for hosiery.
Swing skirts.
The swing skirt had a round cut designed to look best in full jitterbug twirl. Swing skirts were a common sight on USO dance floors as young women danced with uniformed men to the jazzy horns that characterized the Big Band Era. Housewives were known to wear a more conservative version of the swing dress, sometimes in polka-dot or tiny floral prints.
Hats:
Hats became one of the few ways to express individual style with minimal resources. They were worn in a wide range of styles and personalized with scraps of foil, sequins, netting, paper and string.
Hair and makeup:
Hairstyles became more elaborate as women sought ways to contrast their dull wardrobes. Shoulder length or longer hair was rolled into complex shapes and secured with bobby pins. Screen sirens like Lauren Bacall, Veronica Lake and Rita Hayworth popularized side parts and finger waves. Makeup was dramatic, characterized by matte foundation, powder, heavy brows and bright scarlet lips.
Platform pumps:
The wartime shortage of leather and steel forced shoe designers to get more creative and, as a result, shoes were cobbled from materials ranging from crocodile hide to cork. Shoes were more utilitarian than stylish, with low heels and limited color choices. By the mid to late 1940s, platform pumps with high heels in T-straps, ankle straps or open toes had replaced the dowdy wedgie with its flat shape and thick cork soles.
Menswear as womens wear:
A number of men may have spent the first half of the 1940s in uniform, but their civilian clothes came in handy for the women who filled their home-front jobs. Women raided the closets of absent men and tailored the suits to fit themselves. McCalls even introduced a pattern aimed specifically at modifying a masculine suit to fit feminine curves. Suddenly, the sexually ambivalent look pioneered in the late 1930s by Katherine Hepburn and Marlene Dietrich was radical no more. The emergence of the dress pattern and electric sewing machine led women to make their own suits from scratch, opting for gabardine due to the scarcity of wool. Many with physically demanding factory jobs soon began wearing practical pants and Rosie the Riveter jeans.
Sweaters:
By the mid-1940s, many women had abandoned the single-piece corset in favor of panties and structured bras that lifted and accentuated the bust line. In 1946, a well-endowed Jane Russell appeared onscreen in a cantilever bra designed by Howard Hughes, prefiguring the bullet-bra 1950s and the reign of the sweater girl. Loose-fitting cardigans were also popular, particularly on college campuses.
Sportswear:
The virtual disappearance of French fashion houses during the war led American designers to explore their own creativity. Designers like Bonnie Cashin and Claire McCardell were instrumental in the creation of sportswear, that singularly American look featuring coordinated separates that could be worn in layers or in various combinations. The trend not only gave women increased options and made it appear as if they had more clothes than they actually did, but also blurred the line between couture and ready-to-wear by showing women they could be both chic and comfortable without spending a fortune.
The New Look:
By the late 1940s, women craved a return to glamor and designers obliged with swirling skirts and shimmering evening gowns inspired by film stars like Ingrid Bergman, Barbara Stanwyck and Joan Crawford.
In 1947, French couturier Christian Dior almost single-handedly brought an end to wartime austerity with a fashion line observers christened the New Look. Severe angles were replaced with curves, hemlines dropped back below the knee and skirts were generously draped. Structured undergarments were key to the New Look, which featured broad shoulders, cinched waists, emphasized bust lines and padded hips. The pencil skirt was a figure-hugging alternative to bouffant skirts. Men, too, longed for freedom from conservative tailoring in khaki and olive drab. They found relief in wide-legged trousers, full-length coats and suits in an array of colors. Both mens and womens trousers featured higher waists, widely cut legs and cuffs and came in textured tweeds and jewel tones.
The New Look met with protest from women who had grown accustomed to baring their legs and were disinclined to cover them back up. Moreover, the opulent, fabric-rich designs seemed wasteful in contrast to wartime fabric restrictions. The desire for change prevailed, however, and the look flourished throughout much of the 1950s.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/1529787

Monday, February 23, 2015

A British View of Oscars Fashion


Photo
Eddie Redmayne and Hannah Bagshawe; Felicity Jones; Benedict Cumberbatch and Sophie Hunter. Credit Noel West for The New York Times
Photo
Meryl Streep and Cate Blanchett. Credit Noel West for The New York Times
At the London shows Monday morning, the crowd, some looking bleary-eyed and sleep-deprived, rehashed the Oscars, which ended about 5 a.m. local time. There was palpable excitement about two key British wins, Eddie Redmayne for best actor and “The Imitation Game” for best adapted screenplay (though the actual winner, the writer Graham Moore, is American).
But mostly there were grumbles about the fashion, how boring and safe it was (though Marion Cotillard did raise some eyebrows in Dior) and what little presence there was of British designers, even with four British actors (Mr. Redmayne, Benedict Cumberbatch, Rosamund Pike and Felicity Jones) among the top nominees.
“No, no, no,” a woman behind me in line at the Erdem show said to her companion as she swiped through red-carpet images on her phone, dismissing one gown after another.
“Well, that’s nice,” she proclaimed as she rested for a second on a picture of Meryl Streep in Lanvin. “Why don’t more women dress like that?”
There were also mixed reactions to Cate Blanchett, in black Maison Margiela, designed by John Galliano in his return to fashion after his post-Dior exile. Some were happy that Ms. Blanchett seemed to be making a statement of support for the disgraced British designer. Others thought the elegance of the look was undercut by the huge Tiffany bib necklace she wore with it.
“It makes her look old,” one front-row attendee said.
As for the Britons, Mr. Redmayne, a former Burberry model, went with an Alexander McQueen tux, while Mr. Cumberbatch wore a white dinner jacket, and Ms. Pike, a best actress nominee, chose a bright red Givenchy. But the most disappointing, according to an informal poll of the front row, was Ms. Jones, outfitted by Sarah Burton of McQueen in a flouncy ball gown that had the whiff of a bridal dress.
“So unfortunate,” one editor said. “She should have gone younger.”
“Awful,” another editor chimed in as others around her nodded meaningfully.
And then the show started, and thoughts turned to fall 2015.
See all the Oscars looks.
Interested in Fashion Week? Follow the conversation at

Burberry Hosts Starry Show at London Fashion Week

London Fashion Week rolled out the big guns Monday, with British design powerhouse Burberry hosting the glitziest catwalk show of the season. Hunter, the maker of the classic Wellington boots, evoked wild Scottish countryside with indoor waterfalls, while Christopher Kane seduced with clothes featuring nude life drawings.
Here are some highlights from Day 4:
———
FASHIONABLY LATE - OR NOT?
The fashion industry is notorious for its lax timekeeping - a half-hour delay is normal - but unusually strict show times at Burberry meant that one very late guest almost didn't get to see the show.
Supermodel Naomi Campbell, sporting a fluffy white fur coat and dark glasses, arrived well after the catwalk display began and had to push through the crowds to get to her seat in the front.
She didn't seem fazed, though, settling quickly down next to celebrity photographer Mario Testino. Fellow guests swiftly whipped out their smartphones to photograph Campbell, though on the catwalk no one batted an eyelid at the disruption.
With the Oscars clashing with London Fashion Week, the past few days have seen a dearth of big names gracing catwalk front rows. Not so at Burberry. Actress Maggie Gyllenhaal squeezed in with Grammy-winning musician Sam Smith, and all the top British models were here: Kate Moss, Cara Delevingne and Jourdan Dunn.
Campbell and Moss were clearly having a good time, singing and clapping along to the music as a shower of confetti rained down to wrap up the show.
———
BURBERRY PRORSUM
Reinforcing fashion's current fling with all things retro, Burberry showed off a collection rich in patchworks of floral embroidery, bohemian ponchos and quilt-like textures.
The first look, a cozy turquoise and grass-green printed poncho laden with long suede fringes, set the tone. Then came folksy tiered, paisley dresses and hippie versions of the brand's bestselling trench coats, all tan suede and adorned with tassels.
A tan suede cape-dress, covered all over with tiers of fringes - and worn with tasseled shoe-boots, no less - won approving nods from the stars and models gathered in the front row.
Backstage, design chief Christopher Bailey said he wanted to explore "all the different crafts that we have in the British Isles."
Burberry is the biggest and most successful British brand at London Fashion Week, and it's a fairly safe bet that whatever Bailey sends down the catwalk will be copied in a few months in a store near you.
"You know, it's always delightful when something really resonates with people," Bailey said modestly of the influence he wields in fashion. "But you never really know when you do a show how people might express it or translate it."
Bailey said he was "intensely proud" that Eddie Redmayne - who had modeled for Burberry - won best actor at the Oscars on Sunday.
"Not only is he one of the most charming people that you'll ever meet, but he's one of the most talented actors that you'll ever meet as well, so I'm completely delighted for him," he said.
——
HUNTER EVOKES THE GREAT OUTDOORS
Hunter Original took guests to the windswept Scottish glens - via a raw industrial warehouse in south London.
The brand, which specializes in cool, outdoor-inspired clothes, installed multiple waterfalls in the dimly-lit show space and had models walk around a dark pool in parkas, rain ponchos and its signature wellington boot.

Monday, February 16, 2015

10 Cute Outfit Ideas for Every Type of Concert


10 Cute Outfit Ideas for Every Type of Concert
Angela Pham/BFAnyc.com
Whether you’re a Bonnaroo gal or the sweet tunes of Sam Smith’s arena tour is more your speed, we’ve got the outfit for you. After all, when it comes to concert-going, a genre-appropriate look is almost as important as the music (well, for us, at least). Of course there are a few factors to consider: You need to be able to dance, possibly hoof it long distances and, if the concert is outdoors, brave the elements. To help, we’ve compiled ten looks of some of our favorite celebs. Get ready to rock out in style!
Click through to see and shop ten concert-ready outfits!
Start Gallery
  • Rock
  • Rock
  • Velour Romper
  • Riley Leather Moto Boots
  • The High Waist Looker Skinny Jeans
  • Country
  • Country
  • Alexa Chung x AG Kety Skirt
  • Britt Button Down Shirt
  • Bonny West Boots
  • Pop
  • Pop
  • Leather Jacket 1
  • Derek Printed Silk-Chiffon Mini Skirt
  • Silk Halter
  • Outdoor Music Festival
  • Outdoor Music Festival
  • Beach Shorts
  • Denim Kimono Jacket
  • Cassy Mini Dress
  • Alternative
  • Alternative
  • Clochette Dress
  • Tournament Leather Sneakers
  • Turn Around Kim Shoulder Bag